UFS Caddies
Roasted Leg of Lamb, with Rosemary and Parsnips

Slow Roasted Leg of Lamb with Garlic & Rosemary

James Clear, Care UK’s hotel services manager
Serves: 6-8
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Preparation and cooking time: 2 hours and 45 minutes (including cooling)

Ingredients

  • 1 leg of lamb weighing 2.5kg
  • 1 garlic bulb
  • 1 bunch rosemary
  • 2 carrots cut into large chunks
  • 1 onion cut into quarters
  • 1 large glass of red wine (250ml)
  • 1,200ml lamb stock

Method

  1. Stud the leg of lamb with garlic and rosemary by thinly slicing the garlic cloves and removing the sprigs of rosemary from the bunches. Make slight incisions all over the lamb and push the garlic and rosemary into the incisions. Do this in advance as it will marinate over night in the fridge and give a far more intense flavour. Remove from the fridge 1 hour before roasting and season well with salt and pepper


  2. Heat the oven to 190 degrees. Heat a large frying pan add a little oil and brown the leg of lamb on all sides searing the meat. This enables the meat to cook more even and retain moister while roasting. Remove the lamb from the pan and remove excess oil. Deglaze the pan on a high heat with the red wine until it’s reduced by half then add the lamb stock. Once mixed this has taken all of the flavour from the seared meat left in the pan

  3. Place the seared leg of lamb on top of the carrot and onion in a large roasting pan and pour in the red wine and stock mix



  4. Roast for 1 hour and 45 minutes. Turn the lamb half way through so that both sides have been in the stock. When cooked remove the lamb and allow to rest on a plate covered with foil for 30 minutes


  5. To make the gravy pour all of the stock from the roasting tray through a sieve and into a saucepan. Make sure all of the residue from the roasting dish and vegetables are included to get all of the flavour from them while pushing though the sieve


  6. Reduce in a pan and skim off any fat that rises and the gravy should thicken slightly

  7. Serve with fresh vegetables and roast potatoes or dauphinoise potatoes
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